Birmingham to hold runoff elections Tuesday for city council, school board

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Birmingham will hold four runoff elections on Tuesday, Oct. 5.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — Campaign season, at least for city elections, is almost over.

The City of Birmingham will hold runoff elections for four seats — two on the city council and two on the school board — on Tuesday, Oct. 5.

The results of the runoff elections will determine who will represent residents in these districts after no candidate garnered more than half of votes in these races on Aug. 24.

Registered voters in districts one, four and nine can cast ballots on Tuesday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

If needed, you can determine what district you live in, check your voter registration, or find your polling place online ahead of Tuesday’s election.

Below are overviews of each of the four races.

Birmingham City School Board District 1

Sherman Collins, Jr. (left) versus Dr. Doug Ragland (right)

The first district’s school board race is between incumbent Dr. Doug Ragland and challenger Sherman Collins, Jr.

District one is located in northeast Birmingham and includes Spring Lake, Killough Springs, Echo Highlands and parts of Huffman.

In the August election, Ragland and Collins received a nearly equal share of the vote. 42.76% of votes went to Ragland and 43.07% of votes cast went to Ragland.

Although Ragland currently holds the first district seat, Collins is no stranger to the school board. He held the position before, from 2013 until 2017, when he made an unsuccessful bid for city council.

Ragland and Collins participated in a runoff debate held by CBS 42, where they discussed issues ranging from mandatory vaccinations for school children to what they learned from their first jobs. You can watch the debate below or read a summary of it here.

Birmingham City School Board District 9

Le’Darius Hilliard (left) versus Jason Meadows (right)

In the city’s ninth district school board race, Jason Meadows and Le’Darius Hilliard face off to replace incumbent Sandra K. Brown, who chose not to run for re-election.

District 9 is located in the north and west parts of the city and includes the Pratt neighborhoods, Wylam, much of Ensley and parts of North Birmingham.

In the August election, Hilliard received a slightly higher vote share than Meadows. Hilliard received 43.15% of the vote while Meadows received 41.90%.

Meadows and Hilliard participated in a runoff debate hosted by CBS 42, where they discussed charter schools, COVID-19 and the classroom, and much more. You can watch the debate below.

Birmingham City Council District 4

William Parker (left) versus J.T. Moore (right)

In district four, City Council President William Parker is fighting to hold onto his seat in a race against J.T. Moore.

District 4 is located in the north, central part of the city and includes Collegeville, Woodlawn, Kingston and Norwood.

In the August election, Parker significantly outperformed Moore (42% to 23%) but was unable to secure a majority of votes cast, which has resulted in a runoff.

You can read a biography of William Parker on the city council website and a biography of J.T. Moore on his campaign website.

Birmingham City Council District 9

John Hilliard (left) versus LaTonya Tate (right)

In the city’s ninth district, City Councilman John Hilliard is trying to hold on to his seat, as well. Hilliard is facing LaTonya Tate in the runoff.

District 9 is located in the north and west parts of the city and includes the Pratt neighborhoods, Wylam, much of Ensley and parts of North Birmingham.

In the August election, Hilliard significantly outperformed Tate (49% to 29%), but he was unable to win a majority of votes cast, making a runoff necessary.

You can read a biography of Hilliard here and a biography of Tate here.

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