Virus, homicides, drugs put strains on funeral homes

Local News

Funeral director Steven Correa wears gloves as he moves the casket of Gilberto Arreguin Camacho, 58, in preparation for burial following his death due to Covid-19 at Continental Funeral Home on New Year’s Eve, December 31, 2020 in East Los Angeles, California. – Gilberto Arreguin Camacho spent over three weeks in the hospital before his death, according to his son. “He had so much love in his heart for his family,” his son Nestor Arreguin said. “He always had advice for you when you needed it. He was a really hard working man. He worked his whole life. Coming home late, working so hard to provide for his family. Im going to try and follow his legacy.” Arreguin worked as an automobile painter, leaving behind a legacy of children and grandchildren. Family members streamed part of the service for relatives in Mexico who were unable to travel due to pandemic restrictions. (Photo by Patrick T. Fallon / AFP) (Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The director of the Alabama Board of Funeral Service says businesses across the state have been reaching out for advice on how to handle the large volume of recent deaths due to COVID-19 and other causes.

Charles Perine tells AL.com that crematoriums in the state are running almost “around the clock.” And some funeral businesses report adding extra cremation shifts to handle the extra load. AL.com reports that hospitalizations have set new highs throughout January in the state.

And Alabama in January watched the total deaths from the pandemic cross 5,000 and then keep climbing past 6,000.


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