In the Amazon, indigenous debate how to save their lands

International

In this Sept. 3, 2019 photo, indigenous villagers listen to speakers during a meeting of Tembé tribes at the Tekohaw indigenous reserve, Para state, Brazil. Some of the men wore a type of red face paint that signified they were ready for war. Recent clashes saw the Tembe burning the trucks and equipment of illegal loggers on their territory, which is located in a Brazilian state plagued by thousands of fires burning on cleared jungle lands. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

TEKOHAW, Brazil (AP) — Warriors wielding bows and arrows, elderly chieftains in face paint and nursing mothers gathered recently in a Brazilian village to debate a plan that some hope will hold at bay the loggers and other invaders threatening the nine tribes of the Tembe.

The sustainable development plan is meant to help the Tembe profit from the Amazon forest without ruining it. They also want to keep outsiders away from their 1,080-square-mile (2,766-square-kilometer) Alto Rio Guama homeland that is officially protected but in practice under siege.

Recent clashes saw the Tembe burning the trucks and equipment of illegal loggers on their territory, which is in a Brazilian state plagued by thousands of fires burning on cleared Amazon jungle lands.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

TRENDING STORIES

CBS 42 Cares

See more on CBS 42 Cares page