Dallas cop gets 10 years for killing neighbor

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This Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, booking photo provided by the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department shows former Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger. Guyger, who shot her black unarmed neighbor Botham Jean to death after, she said, mistaking his apartment for her own, was convicted of murder Tuesday. (Dallas County Sheriff’s Department via AP)

DALLAS (AP) — The Latest on the trial of a former Dallas police officer convicted of murder in the shooting death of her neighbor inside his apartment (all times local):

10:15 p.m.

Dozens of protesters marched through parts of downtown Dallas to protest the 10-year sentence given to a white former police officer convicted of murder in the shooting death of her black neighbor.

The demonstrators Wednesday night sometimes blocked traffic on heavily traveled streets outside the courts building where Amber Guyger was sentenced and through the western section of downtown.

One woman was taken into custody after it appeared she didn’t follow police orders to clear the street and move to the sidewalk.

Guyger, who was convicted of murder Tuesday, said she mistook Botham Jean’s apartment for hers and thought he was an intruder before shooting him in September 2018.

About 30 protesters chanted “No justice, no peace; no racist police” and “Amber alert!” as they marched through the streets surrounded by up to a dozen police officers, some in riot gear.

Around 20 other demonstrators remained outside the courts building and jail.

As a police helicopter circled overhead, officers tried to keep the marchers on the sidewalks and out of the paths of cars.

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8:30 p.m.

The statement of forgiveness by Botham Jean’s younger brother to the former police officer who shot and killed his sibling drew acclaim from the congregation of a church where Jean led the singing.

Brandt Jean made his victim’s impact statement Wednesday afternoon after a jury sentenced Amber Guyger to 10 years in prison for murder in the death of his older brother.

The video of the statement was shown at the Dallas West Church of Christ, where the Jean family gathered to worship Wednesday night.

When the video showed the 18-year-old embrace Guyger in a gesture of forgiveness and healing, the congregation broke into applause and “amens.” Some cried openly.

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6:30 p.m.

The judge overseeing the trial of a white Dallas police officer convicted of killing her black neighbor in his apartment hugged the former officer after jurors sentenced her to 10 years in prison.

Judge Tammy Kemp hugged Amber Guyger on Wednesday after the brother of the victim forgave Guyger and hugged her in front of the packed courtroom.

Brandt Jean, whose brother, Botham Jean, lived in the fourth-floor apartment directly above Guyger’s, told Guyger that his brother would have wanted her to turn her life over to Christ and that if she asks God for forgiveness, she will get it.

The jury convicted Guyger of murder in the September 2018 killing, which Guyger attributed to mistaking Jean’s apartment for her own.

4:45 p.m.

The brother of a man who was killed by a Dallas police officer in his own home has forgiven and hugged her in the courtroom where she was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Addressing Amber Guyger in the courtroom Wednesday after the jury sentenced her to a decade behind bars for killing his brother, Botham Jean, Brandt Jean said he thinks that his brother would want Guyger to give her life to Christ.

He said, “I love you as a person. I don’t wish anything bad on you.”

He then said “I don’t know if this is possible, but can I give her a hug?”

The judge said he could and Jean and Guyger embraced in front of the courtroom as Guyger sobbed.

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4:25 p.m.

The 10-year prison sentence given to a white Dallas police officer for the killing of her black neighbor was met with boos and jeers from people in the hallway outside the courtroom.

The jury that convicted Amber Guyger of murder in the killing of Botham Jean on Tuesday sentenced her to a decade behind bars. It could have sentenced her to anywhere from two years to life in prison.

As Jean’s family walked out of the courtroom after the hearing, the group in the hallway began a chant of, “No justice! No peace!” Two black women hugged each other and cried.

Sheriff’s deputies cleared the hallway outside the courtroom before more officers escorted Guyger’s family out and down a side staircase.

Guyger said she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own, which was one floor below his, and mistook him for a burglar.

4:05 p.m.

A white Dallas police officer has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for fatally shooting her unarmed, black neighbor in his home.

The jury sentenced Amber Guyger on Wednesday. Guyger was convicted of murder Tuesday in the September 2018 killing of her upstairs neighbor, Botham Jean.

In Texas, a murder sentence can range from five years to life in prison, but the judge also instructed jurors on a so-called sudden passion defense, which carries a range of 2-20 years behind bars.

Guyger was still dressed in her police uniform after a long shift when she shot Jean, a 26-year-old accountant from the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia. She was fired from the force and charged with murder.

Guyger testified that she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own, which was one floor below, and that she thought he was a burglar in her home.

WATCH: Press Conference after sentencing in Amber Guyger case

2:55 p.m.

Jurors are considering the sentence for a white Dallas police officer whom they convicted of murder for shooting her black neighbor in his apartment, which she says she mistook for her own unit one floor below.

Amber Guyger could be sentenced to five years to life in prison for killing Botham Jean, though jurors could also sentence her to as little as two years if they determine her crime was one of sudden passion.

A prosecutor told jurors Wednesday that when deciding the sentence for the September 2018 killing, they can consider racially insensitive texts that Guyger sent to her police partner. She said they shouldn’t sentence Guyger to less than 28 years, which is how old Jean would have been today.

Her attorney, Toby Shook, said the texts were sent “at a whim” and weren’t indicative of Guyger’s whole life. He asked jurors to consider a black woman who credited Guyger with helping her recover from drug use.

12:50 p.m.

A woman who met Amber Guyger when the Dallas police officer busted a drug house says Guyger helped her turn around her life.

LaWanda Clark told jurors Wednesday during Guyger’s murder trial that she struggled with a crack cocaine addiction and that Guyger wrote her a ticket on the day of the drug bust. She says Guyger told her that the ticket could be the impetus to turn her life around.

While Clark was speaking, attorneys showed jurors a photo of Guyger attending Clark’s graduation from a community drug treatment program.

Clark said Guyger treated her as a person, not as “an addict,” and said she is now sober.

Guyger faces up to life in prison for the September 2018 shooting death of Botham Jean. She says she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own, which was one floor below.

12:35 p.m.

A high school friend who played in an all-female mariachi band with Amber Guyger says the former Dallas police officer feels “immense remorse” for fatally shooting a neighbor in his own apartment.

Maribel Chavez testified Wednesday that she met Guyger in ninth grade during orchestra practice. They later went on to play in a mariachi band, with Guyger playing violin and trumpet.

Chavez said Guyger is typically bubbly and extroverted, but that since she killed her neighbor, Botham Jean, in September 2018, “It’s like you shut her light off.”

She described her friend as selfless, caring and a protector of those around her.

Guyger says she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own, which was one floor below his. She faces up to life in prison after she was convicted of murder on Tuesday.

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12:25 p.m.

Former colleagues have been testifying in support of a white Dallas police officer convicted of killing her black neighbor.

Amber Guyger faces up to life in prison for the 2018 shooting death of 26-year-old Botham Jean, a black accountant who was killed inside his apartment, which was directly above hers.

Officer Cathy Odhiambo, who is black, described Guyger as a longtime friend and the “sweetest person.”

Odhiambo wasn’t asked about text messages introduced as evidence during the trial that indicated a lack of sensitivity by Guyger toward black people. However, another fellow officer, Thomas MacPherson, told jurors that some of those texts sounded “out of character” for Guyger.

The testimony Wednesday came during the punishment phase of the trial. Guyger was convicted Tuesday of murder in Jean’s killing.

WATCH: Ex-Dallas cop Amber Guyger awaits her sentence

11:35 a.m.

The mother of a Dallas police officer who was convicted of killing an upstairs neighbor is telling jurors about her daughter.

Karen Guyger is the first witness to testify in defense of Amber Guyger during the sentencing portion of Guyger’s trial.

Karen Guyger said Wednesday that Amber Guyger is the youngest of three children, and defense attorneys showed several family photos to the jury.

Upon questioning from defense attorneys, Karen Guyger testified that her daughter had been sexually assaulted by an adult male when she was a young child.

Amber Guyger faces up to life in prison for the fatal shooting of Botham Jean. She says she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own one floor below and mistook him for a burglar.

10:50 a.m.

The father of Botham Jean says his life has been upended since a Dallas police officer shot and killed his son in his son’s own apartment last year.

Bertrum Jean tearfully told jurors on Wednesday that after Botham left their home in St. Lucia for college in Arkansas, he would call home every Sunday after church.

Now, Bertrum Jean said, “My Sundays have been destroyed.”

The testimony came during the sentencing portion of the murder trial of Amber Guyger, who was convicted of murder Tuesday and faces a sentence that could range from two years to life in prison, depending on what the jury decides.

Guyger, who was fired after the shooting, says she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own and thought he was a burglar.

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10:25 a.m.

A college classmate has told jurors about her friendship with Botham Jean, an accountant who was killed last year in his home by a Dallas police officer who lived in his building.

Alexis Stossel said Wednesday that she met Jean when they attended Harding University in Arkansas. She says she and Jean quickly became close friends, and they both moved to Dallas after graduating.

Stossel says Jean was the emcee at her wedding and was a natural leader whom people gravitated toward.

Stossel, who is white, also touched on Jean’s sense of humor, saying Jean always insisted that she refer to him as “my black friend Botham” when posting photos on social media.

Stossel’s testimony comes as jurors consider the sentence for Amber Guyger, who was convicted of murder Tuesday for killing Jean. Guyger, who was fired after the shooting, says she mistook his apartment for her own one floor below.

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10:15 a.m.

The judge in the trial of a Dallas police officer convicted of murder for killing her black neighbor in his home says the jury will get instruction on a legal defense that could reduce the officer’s sentencing range.

The jury convicted Amber Guyger of murder Tuesday in the September 2018 killing of Botham Jean. In Texas, the penalty for murder could be anywhere from five years to life in prison.

But Judge Tammy Kemp said Wednesday that jurors will receive written guidance on the law regarding a so-called “sudden passion defense.”

If the jury accepts that Guyger’s actions were taken in the heat of the moment, it could reduce the sentencing range to two to 20 years.

Guyger says she shot Jean after mistaking his apartment for her own, which was directly below. She was fired after the shooting.

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The Latest on the trial of a former Dallas police officer convicted of murder in the shooting death of her neighbor inside his apartment (all times local):

9:34 a.m.

Court has resumed in the punishment phase in the trial of a white Dallas police officer who was convicted in the fatal shooting of her black neighbor last year.

Court was back in session Wednesday for the second day in the punishment phase for Amber Guyger. Testimony began Tuesday after she was convicted of murder in the death of Botham Jean. Those testifying included Jean’s friends and family, who explained how his death affected them.

Guyger, who could be sentenced to anywhere from five years to life in prison, said she mistook Jean’s apartment for her own. Her defense attorneys can argue that she deserves a light sentence because she acted out of confusion and fear that she had found an intruder.

Guyger, who was off duty but in uniform at the time of the shooting, was later fired from the force.

The same jury that convicted a white Dallas police officer in the fatal shooting of her black neighbor returns to court Wednesday to consider her sentence — a penalty that could be anywhere from five years to life in prison.

Amber Guyger, who said she mistook the man’s apartment for her own, which was directly below, was convicted of murder in a verdict that drew tears of relief from his family and chants of “black lives matter” from a crowd outside the courtroom.

Guyger sat alone, weeping, at the defense table.

Her defense attorneys can argue that she deserves a light sentence because she acted out of confusion and fear that she had found an intruder in her home. Prosecutors have given no indication in court of the sentence they will seek. Attorneys are under a gag order.

It was unclear how long the punishment phase of the trial would last. Testimony began Tuesday after the verdict, starting with Botham Jean’s friends and family, who explained how his death affected them.

First on the stand was Allison Jean, who said her son was killed just before he was to turn 27.

“My life has not been the same. It’s just been like a roller coaster. I can’t sleep, I cannot eat. It’s just been the most terrible time for me,” she said.

Botham Jean’s sister, Allisa Findley, told the jury that she and her mother cry a lot. Her formerly “bubbly” younger brother has retreated as if into a shell, and her father is “not the same.”

WATCH: Amber Guyger faces sentencing for murder charges in the shooting death of her neighbor

“It’s like the light behind his eyes is off,” Findley said.

She said her children are now afraid of police.

Prosecutors submitted text messages that indicated Guyger lacks sensitivity toward black people. In one, she suggests participants at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade in Dallas could be persuaded to go home with the use of physical violence and pepper spray.

WATCH: Amber Guyger Sentencing Trial Day 1:

In a message sent to Guyger’s phone, the messenger suggests she would like a German shepherd because the dog is racist. Guyger declares that she hates “everything and everyone but y’all.”

The basic facts of the unusual shooting were not in dispute throughout the trial. Guyger said that after a long shift at work and still in uniform, she walked up to Jean’s apartment — which was on the fourth floor, directly above hers on the third — and found the door unlocked. She said she thought the apartment was her own when she drew her service weapon and entered.

Jean, an accountant from the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia, had been eating a bowl of ice cream when Guyger fired.

The shooting drew widespread attention because of the strange circumstances and because it was one in a string of shootings of unarmed black men by white police officers.

The verdict was “a victory for black people in America,” said Lee Merritt, one of the lawyers for Jean’s family. “It’s a signal that the tide is going to change here. Police officers are going to be held accountable for their actions, and we believe that will begin to change policing culture around the world.”

The jury was largely made up of women and people of color.

Attorney Ben Crump, also representing the family, credited the makeup of the jury with Tuesday’s conviction, and said he expects them to deliver a weighty sentence.

“I look at this jury. And I look at the diversity of this jury,” he said. “They will see past all the technical, intellectual justifications for an unjustifiable killing. And I believe they will do the right thing.”

Dallas Police Association President Mike Mata declined to comment Tuesday, saying Guyger’s lawyers asked him to wait until after sentencing. The group, which represents city police officers, has paid for Guyger’s legal defense and security.

The verdict may have defused tensions that began simmering Monday when jurors were told they could consider whether Guyger had a right to use deadly force under a Texas law known as the castle doctrine — even though she was not in her own home. The law is similar to “stand your ground” measures across the U.S. that declare a person has no duty to retreat from an intruder.

In a frantic 911 call played repeatedly during the trial, Guyger said “I thought it was my apartment” nearly 20 times. Her lawyers argued that the identical physical appearance of the apartment complex from floor to floor frequently led to tenants going to the wrong apartments.

But prosecutors questioned how Guyger could have missed numerous signs that she was in the wrong place. They also asked why she did not call for backup and suggested she was distracted by sexually explicit phone messages with her police partner.

Guyger, 31, was arrested three days after the killing. She was later fired and charged with murder.Tension has been high during the trial in Dallas, where five police officers were killed in an attack three years ago.

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