Alabama officials find spiked CBD products sold in the state

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama health officials had good reason when earlier this year they warned that products labeled as the cannabis extract CBD may not contain what they claim.

The state’s forensic scientists had identified dangerous synthetic marijuana in more than two dozen vapes or edible products marketed as CBD. Back in February, State Health Officer Dr. Scott Harris released a press release through the Alabama Department of Public Health warning the public to avoid using any “untested, unregulated and potentially dangerous products,” such as CBD.

“Products labeled as CBD oil and/or other CBD-related products might contain any number of substances, and there is no assurance they are safe to consume as they have not been evaluated or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration,” Dr. Harris said. “Instead of helping relieve symptoms, using CBD products can have side effects that include harmful interactions with other medications. If you suspect a tainted CBD product has caused you to be ill, contact a poison control center and seek medical attention.”

The Associated Press gathered the results for an investigation into how some operators are capitalizing on the CBD boom by substituting a cheap street drug for the real thing.

That practice has sent dozens of people nationwide to emergency rooms. Unlike real CBD, synthetic marijuana gives an intense high.

In all, lab testing shows spiked vape or edible CBD products such as gummy bears in at least 13 states.

Industry representatives acknowledge spiking is an issue, but say many companies are reputable.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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